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Olympic Athletes Need to Be Careful Online During Games

Olympic athletes hold themselves to the highest of standards: on the ice, on the slopes and now online.
 Olympic athletes hold themselves to the highest of standards: on the ice, on the slopes and now online.

Athletes can update their fans on Twitter and Facebook but they need to be careful.  They have to keep updates personal.  They can't talk about non-Olympic sponsors, such as skier Lindsey Vonn's deal with Red Bull. And they can't post pictures of official ceremonies or of anyone participating in the Games.  If athletes break the rules, they could be kicked out.

It's causing a lot of confusion.  Vonn thought she couldn't be on Twitter at all.   She told her fans that she'd be back after the Olympics but the next day, she said she made a mistake.

Just 2 days ago, speedskater Apolo Anton Ohno tweeted about a perk with his Olympic credential.  He wrote that it's a cool key from Coca-Cola that "allows you to swipe it anywhere and get free products!"  That's okay since Coke is an official sponsor.

There are 3 athletes from New York that keep up with Twitter:  Erin Hamlin from Remsen, NY (Luge) ; Trevor Marsicano from Ballston Spa, NY (speedskating) ; and Andrew Weibrecht from Lake Placid, NY (alpine skiing) .
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