61°F
Sponsored by

SCOTUS Challenged By Greece Prayer Case

Based on the responses from the highest judges in the country, the debate over prayers in Greece will not be an easy one to settle.
Based on the responses from the highest judges in the country, the debate over prayers in Greece will not be an easy one to settle. 

What started as a local lawsuit about prayer before Greece Town Board meetings now has a spot in history at the U.S. Supreme Court.

It leaves the court to decide if those prayers are constitutional. The nine justices seemed hesitant to have government get involved in playing a censorship role in prayers.

Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan summarized their dilemma best when she said this was not an easy decision for the court, which is usually seen as hostile towards religion.

The two women who started this case, Susan Galloway and Linda Stephens, feel the mostly-Christian prayers are coercive and not inclusive.

The attorney for the town of Greece says history is on its side with prayers dating back to the founding of the nation. 

"This is about including everyone in our government. You shouldn't have to endure religious indoctrination to participate in your own town government. It's ridiculous," Linda Stephens said.

"It's not proselytizing. First of all, no one is requried to do it. People are free not to do it and similar things happen from time to time in the legislature or in Congress; and since people are free to pray or not as they choose, there's no constitutional problem with that, " said the attorney for the Town of Greece.

It is unknown when the justices will make a decision in this case, but it will happen before the end of June. 


Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus